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Dad
01/10/1931 - 09/02/2003

Diagnosed as having a terminal glioblastoma (brain) tumour in November 2001.
Informed by the surgeon that average life expectancy for such tumours could be
'180 days (20/05/2002) without treatment or 280 days (28/08/2002) with radiotherapy'!


Post op 21st November 2001
 
Radio therapy Spring 2002
     

Sleepy steroid summer 2002
 
Bedridden and spoonfed 3rd February 2003
     
     
  JONES, Lloyd Glynn. Passed away peacefully at home on February 9, 2003.
Loving Husband of Mum and Father of Sis1, Sis2 and Terry. Post Office
veteran. Will be sadly missed. Funeral service, 12 noon Monday, February 17 at
Torquay Crematorium. Family flowers only, donations to Rowcroft Hospice,
Avenue Road, Torquay. TQ5 5LS. All enquiries to Funeral Directors. Telephone
01803 882135.
 
Bristol Evening Post 12/13th February 2003 (Online on 13th February 2003)
     
     
  A Tribute to Lloyd Glynn Jones
1/10/1931 - 9/2/2003
Torquay Crematorium
Monday February 17th, 2003
 
     
     
  Claire de Lune’ - Debussy  
     
  Welcome to our celebration of the life of Lloyd Glynn Jones, beloved husband of Mum, father of Sis1, Sis2 and Terry, and brother of Uncle TJ. The family did not want this goodbye to be a sad one, it was not Glynn’s wish. They have tried to put a few words together to express the depth of their love and gratitude, but words at such a time can be hard to find. It is hoped that the songs that Glynn and his wife recently chose, in anticipation of this day, will speak in some small part on their behalf.

Fifteen months ago, after surgery, Glynn and his family were informed that he had an incurable brain tumour and would only have between six and nine months to live. Not once did he indulge in self-pity, anger or remorse. Selflessly his every thought was for the well-being of those around him, even the surgeons, doctors and nurses, whom he thanked and praised constantly. More than once his family was complimented on his dying the death of a gentleman. He was a “gentle” man indeed, but not without an endurance and inner strength sufficient to see him outlive all predictions.

With gratitude, courage and his unfailing humour, he helped his wife and family prepare themselves for his parting, plan for the future, celebrate the past, and say their ‘love you’s’ and goodbyes. Glynn’s qualities of honesty and kindness were a testament of his virtue. If, in time, he should be remembered for nothing else, let him be remembered as an example of a decent, loyal and dedicated family man, but most of all, a man of enduring love for his wife
Mum, whose name was the last he called.
 
     
     
  Softly As I Leave
Matt Munroe

Softly,
I will leave you, softly,
For my heart would break,
If you should wake
And see me go
So I leave you softly,
Long before you miss me
Long before your arms can beg me stay
For one more hour or one more day
After all the years
I can’t bear the tears to fall
So softly, as I leave you there.

Softly,
Long before you miss me,
Long before your arms can beg me stay
For one more hour or one more day
After all the years
I can’t bear the tears to fall
So softly, as I leave you there
As I leave you there
As I leave you there.
 
     
     
  With Glynn’s passing we are already remembering the man he was when fit and well. Glynn met Mum whilst fishing with a friend, at the Lido in Bristol. Who would have thought his prize catch that day would have resulted in a life-long love and marriage? He married at the age of 23 in Filton and became a father of three by the age of 28, living in Downend. He was the ultimate family man. Having been the product of a broken marriage himself, he was determined to provide his family with the safety and security that his own childhood lacked. His loyalty to his own mother and brother never wavered, and as a husband and father he could never do enough for his wife and children.

Glynn was of the generation when a career was for life. He started working for the Post Office in Bristol as a fourteen-year-old telegram boy, and after a spell of National Service, during which he served in the RAF in Egypt, he diligently worked his way up through the Post Office ranks. Throughout his 44 year career he was committed, honest, genuine and truly dedicated to ‘the job’, when such qualities were judged obsolete by lesser men.

In the early years, providing for a young family on a Post Office wage was difficult, and financial hardship was not unknown. With steadfast determination he was always committed to making whatever personal sacrifices were required to ensure his family was well cared for. By necessity, in those early years, he became a perfectionist at anything he turned his hand to. As his children grew up and took on homes of their own, he was always willing, at a moments notice, to rush in and fix this or repair that, with energy and enthusiasm, to a standard that will remain a benchmark for the rest of their lives. Even in his last months of life this interest was undiminished.

There are too many cherished memories of Glynn to do justice to them here in such few words. You each have your own. As Glynn himself used to say “life is nothing more than memories”.
 
     
     
  The Way We Were
Johnny Mathis

Memories, like the corners of my mind
Misty water-coloured memories
Of the way we were.
Scattered pictures of the smiles we left behind
Smiles we gave to one another
For the way we were.
Can it be that it was all so simple then
Or has time rewritten every line
And if we had the chance to do it all again
Tell me would we, could we?

Can it be that it was all so simple then
Or has time rewritten every line
And if we had the chance to do it all again
Tell me would, we could we

Memories may be beautiful and yet
What’s too painful to remember we simply choose to forget.
So it’s the laughter, the laughter we remember, whenever we remember
The way we were,
The way we were.
 
     
     
  This is a time and place for tears, for we have all suffered a loss in Glynn’s parting, but he will always be remembered by his family for his sense of humour and the fun and laughter that he brought to their lives. In this last act together, as we say goodbye to Glynn, his family know he has a smile on his face.  
     
  “Weep if you must, parting is hell,
But life goes on, so smile as well.”
 
     
     
  Smile
Nat King Cole

Smile, though your heart is aching,
Smile, even though its breaking,
When there are clouds in the sky you’ll get by,
If you smile through your fear and sorrow,
Smile and maybe tomorrow
You’ll see the sun come shining through
For you.

Light up your face with gladness,
Hide every trace of sadness,
Although a tear maybe ever so near,
That’s the time you must keep on trying,
Smile, what’s the use of crying,
You’ll find that life is still worth while
If you just smile.

That’s the time you must keep on trying,
Smile, what’s the use of crying,
You’ll find that life is still worth while
If you just smile.
 
     
     
  Lloyd Glynn Jones
“He was a man, take him for all in all,
We shall not look upon his like again”
(William Shakespeare)
 
     
     
  Claire de Lune’ - Debussy  
     
     

Dad's cremated remains 18th February 2003
     
Comments on this page last updated on 5th April 2014

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